Hotel with solar panels(1)

An increasing number of business travellers are opting for green-certified hotels in an effort to curb the impact of their frequent travelling. A new survey (Global Business Traveler Survey 2013) by market research firm Timetric indicates that 47% of respondents confirmed that it is ‘important’ for them to stay in green-certified hotels during business trips. 7% of the respondents consider green certifications to be an ‘extremely important’ factor in their choice of hotel. This is indeed a healthy trend and the awareness on reducing individual footprint now seems to be having an impact!

How are hotels going green?
Survey results show that for a hotel to be considered green, respondents consider ‘low-energy light bulbs’ and ‘reduced use of plastic materials’ to be the main sustainability facilities that hotels should adopt. ‘Solar-energy water heating’ was another important factor, particularly for respondents in the Asia-Pacific region. Respondents from companies operating in North America and Europe consider ‘timer lighting systems’ and ‘post-consumer recycled paper products’ as important actions to be undertaken by hotels. Hotel chains are also implementing measures to curtail plastic waste generation.

Bali’s hotels set an example
The Timetric research focused itself on the Bali Hotels Association (BHA) in Indonesia. It found that the BHA was successful in reducing the use of plastic in 2012 with the introduction of its ‘Say No to Disposable Plastics’ campaign. A total of 30 participating hotels within the Island were successful in attaining average reduction in plastic use by 23%. A senior executive from the association said: “When we launched this program in April 2011, our aim was to see an overall reduction of 20%. The fact that we have exceeded this is testament to our members’ commitment to preserving Bali’s natural heritage, both as a tourism destination and for its inhabitants.”

Realising the increasing customer preference for green hotels, several hotel chains across Indonesia have started to invest in obtaining green certification and in reducing their carbon footprint. This is a very healthy trend in the tourism industry and will have a significant impact towards improving the environment. Hopefully the rest of South Asia, as well as the world at large will soon follow suit.

Hotels Going Green As Business Travellers Preferring Green-Certified Hotels Gaia Corporate Greening,,,,,
An increasing number of business travellers are opting for green-certified hotels in an effort to curb the impact of their frequent travelling. A new survey (Global Business Traveler Survey 2013) by market research firm Timetric indicates that 47% of respondents confirmed that it is ‘important’ for them to stay in green-certified...
<img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7656" alt="Hotel with solar panels(1)" src="http://delhigreens.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Hotel-with-solar-panels1.jpg" width="500" height="325" /> An increasing number of business travellers are opting for green-certified hotels in an effort to curb the impact of their frequent travelling. A new survey <i>(Global Business Traveler Survey 2013)</i> by market research firm Timetric indicates that 47% of respondents confirmed that it is ‘important’ for them to stay in green-certified hotels during business trips. 7% of the respondents consider green certifications to be an ‘extremely important’ factor in their choice of hotel. This is indeed a healthy trend and the awareness on reducing individual footprint now seems to be having an impact! <b>How are hotels going green?</b> Survey results show that for a hotel to be considered green, respondents consider ‘low-energy light bulbs’ and ‘reduced use of plastic materials’ to be the main sustainability facilities that hotels should adopt. ‘Solar-energy water heating’ was another important factor, particularly for respondents in the Asia-Pacific region. Respondents from companies operating in North America and Europe consider ‘timer lighting systems’ and ‘post-consumer recycled paper products’ as important actions to be undertaken by hotels. Hotel chains are also implementing measures to curtail plastic waste generation. <b>Bali’s hotels set an example</b> The Timetric research focused itself on the Bali Hotels Association (BHA) in Indonesia. It found that the BHA was successful in reducing the use of plastic in 2012 with the introduction of its ‘Say No to Disposable Plastics’ campaign. A total of 30 participating hotels within the Island were successful in attaining average reduction in plastic use by 23%. A senior executive from the association said: “When we launched this program in April 2011, our aim was to see an overall reduction of 20%. The fact that we have exceeded this is testament to our members’ commitment to preserving Bali’s natural heritage, both as a tourism destination and for its inhabitants.” Realising the increasing customer preference for green hotels, several hotel chains across Indonesia have started to invest in obtaining green certification and in reducing their carbon footprint. This is a very healthy trend in the tourism industry and will have a significant impact towards improving the environment. Hopefully the rest of South Asia, as well as the world at large will soon follow suit.
  

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