Wednesday, March 27Delhi Greens Blog: Greening the World, One Post at a Time!

Author: A.P. Jayanthi

The author is the Programme Coordinator at Delhi Greens.
  • twitter

Recently published posts:

At the Brink of a Crisis: Ground Water Scenario in Delhi

At the Brink of a Crisis: Ground Water Scenario in Delhi

Articles
While the neighbouring cities of Gurgaon and NOIDA have exhausted their ground water and are nearly on their deathbed, the citizens of Delhi heard grand promises of 700 litres of free drinking water each day along with a 50% reduction in electricity tariff. Such assurance, undoubtedly, made a fancy election manifesto. However, parties promising any assurance of water supply in Delhi will have to rethink their strategy for water management in a much more urgent and serious manner. According to a National Sample Survey Organisation (NSSO) survey, 15.6% of Delhi's urban households and 29.7% of its rural ones don't get sufficient drinking water throughout the year, well above the all-India average. The survey suggests that in comparison to 27 states and six union territories, Delhi’s ru
Wanted: A Sustainable City for Women

Wanted: A Sustainable City for Women

Articles
With women’s contribution to world income showing an increase from the 1970s, cities across the world have started redesigning their public spaces to provide equal access to women. In India, however, gender sensitivity is still seen lacking in cities like Delhi, right from the manner in which our urban infrastructure is planned. In Delhi, women and girls still have a lot to worry about when it comes to their personal safety. They are increasingly being the prime target of sexual and domestic violence and other urban crimes. Whether walking city streets, using public transport, going to school, or selling goods at the market, women face the threat of harassment and violence. This grim reality of everyday life affects women's mobility and freedom to get an education, to work, and to e
Stars for the Star: Tiger Conservation Through Celebrities

Stars for the Star: Tiger Conservation Through Celebrities

Articles
The most recent celebrity who has lent his name for the cause of saving the tiger is Hollywood actor Leonardo DiCaprio. Having met Jairam Ramesh in New York this September at the reception of the Coalition of Rainforest Nations, DiCaprio reportedly expressed his interest to play a crucial role in sensitizing the global community to the cause of the Indian tiger. In his statement released through the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) earlier this year, the actor had said “Key Conservation efforts can save the Indian tigers species from extinction, protect some of the planet’s last wild habitats and help sustain local communities surrounding them”. DiCaprio is not the first celebrity to get behind the cause of saving the Indian tiger. And going by the trend, he definitely isn't the las
Deadly Rail Tracks Bring Elephants Under Threat

Deadly Rail Tracks Bring Elephants Under Threat

Articles
The killing of elephants on railway tracks in West Bengal made headlines recently. On 22nd September, seven elephants including one calf were mowed down by a Guwahati bound goods train near Moraghat level crossing around midnight. The railway track in question passes through an elephant corridor which, according to the Forest Department's Expert Committee, was not considered as accident prone area. Consequently and as indicated by the scale of casualty, the train was moving with a speed much higher than the permissible speed limit of 25 kmph. The Railway authorities later confirmed the speed of the train at the time of the accident to be 70 kmph. The tragic incident has sent shock waves across the conservation community in India. The incident has brought into attention the threat po...
Bengal Tiger Consultation: Securing the Future for the Tigers in India

Bengal Tiger Consultation: Securing the Future for the Tigers in India

Green Alert
The recently concluded The Future of the Bengal Tiger, a conference hosted by the Sanctuary Asia, brought together over 150 delegates, speakers and other participants from all walks of life. Held on 6th August 2010 at the Teen Murti House auditorium, the participants were a blend of wildlife conservationist, researchers, media persons, bureaucrats, foresters and many school students and laypersons. Though students represented the majority, the blend of participants reflected the growing interest in tiger conservation among the general public. The conferences entailed talks by the forest department officials, military personnel, politicians, wildlife biologists and journalists. The sessions also dealt with issues like corruption, conflicting mandates among the different bureaucracies...