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Top Ten Bird Watching Sites in Delhi

Top Ten Bird Watching Sites in Delhi

Green Living
The National Capital Territory of Delhi, with its wetlands and sprawling green cover attracts a wide variety of our winged friends every year. This makes the NCT of Delhi a birdwatcher's paradise. Surprisingly, Delhi is the world's second most bird diversity-rich city, after Nairobi. Over 460 species of birds have been recorded in Delhi so far. If you are an avid birder or a nature lover, then grab your binoculars and/or camera and head out to these ten enticing locations. 1. Yamuna Biodiversity Park Located near Wazirabad Village, the Yamuna Biodiversity Park (YBP) is located on the alluvial plains of River Yamuna in North Delhi. The site is a nature conservation site for native plants which are otherwise becoming locally extinct in Delhi. The park has 457 acres of grasslands, ri...
Environmental News and Media Roundup for Week 40, 2012

Environmental News and Media Roundup for Week 40, 2012

Green Alert
Weekly environmental news roundup from across different media networks for week 40 (starting October 1, 2012) 2012. 1. Ghazipur waste-to-energy plant trial runs soon Delhi’s second waste-to-energy plant in Ghazipur is set to begin pilot runs by the end of October. The first one is in Timarpur Okhla. 2. Delhi trains to have green toilets by coming March There is some good news for activists who have been asking the Indian Railways to sort out the problem of manual scavenging due to the existence of conventional toilets in trains. 3. Garbage plant to produce power, CNG With the Ghazipur landfill site unable to take in more municipal waste, the East Delhi Municipal Corporation has started work on building two plants at the site — one to generate electricity and another t
Climate Change Adaptation

Climate Change Adaptation

Green Alert
There is a bridge in Lodhi Gardens and there is a plaque that declares that this bridge was constructed in 1556 by Akbar’s minister over a tributary of Yamuna river that used to flow from here toward what is now known as South Delhi. The river since has changed its course and there is no water under the bridge. This is a typical example of what happened in the past when mitigative actions of bounding the river sides of the tributary were not taken, and the river changed its course.  Of course the context was that density of population was low, therefore the infrastructure damage that a river would cause due to course change was manageable. While mitigation is ideal, adaptation in the short run is necessary to cope with the floods that may happen in the course of climate change. Rece

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